Princeton Math Circle







Welcome to the
Princeton Math Circle!

Our Mission

Princeton Math Circle is a weekly program for the high school and the middle school students of Princeton and its surrounding communities. It meets on Saturdays from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm for middle-school students and from 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm for high school students at Fine Hall on the Princeton University campus. 

The program is sponsored by the members of the Princeton University. Its mission is to:

  • inspire, encourage and excite young students about mathematics,
  • build a stronger foundation in math for success in their future careers, and
  • prepare them to compete for American Mathematics Competitions (AMC 8/10/12), US Math Olympiad and International Math Olympiad Championships.

This program is NOT to supplement what is learned at school, or to improve test scores, or grades, but rather means to foster interest in mathematics among local school kids to help them become tomorrow's scientists, economists, engineers and mathematicians.












Registration

Registration Policy:
First come - first served,
space permitting.

Current Status:
Registration is now closed.


News and Accomplishments

2011 AMC 8 Winners:

Our Top Scorers:

1. Byron Chin (7th Grader) - Distinction 
2. Jasen Zhang (8th Grader) - Distinction
3. Maitreyee DasGupta (7th Grader) - Distinction
4. Matthew Pan (8th Grader) - Distinction
5. Tyler Shen (7th Grader) - Distinction
6. Sharon Zhang (7th Grader) - Honor Roll
7. Xiutong Wu (7th Grader) - Honor Roll
8. Jeremy Zhang - Honor Roll
9. Shuvam Chakraborty - (8th Grader) - Honor Roll
10. Rhea Khatry (7th Grader) - Honor Roll
11. Jay Yalamanchili (7th Grader) - Honor Roll
12. Hasit Dantara (6th Grader) - Honor Roll and Achievement Roll
13. Michael Bi (7th Grader) - Honor Roll
14. Phoebe Wang (8th Grader) - Honor Roll
15. Anish Visaria (8th Grader) - Honor Roll
16. Julian Zhang (6th Grader) - Honor and Achievement Roll
17. Vadym Glushkov (8th Grader) - Honor Roll
18. Divyansh Devnani (7th Grader) - Honor Roll
19. Brian Wang
20. Nikhil Parchuri (5th Grader) - Achievement Roll
21. Vishaal Anand (6th Grader) - Achievement Roll
22. Ashwin Dandamudi (6th Grader) - Achievement Roll
23. Divya Unnam (7th Grader)
24. Disha Hegde (7th Grader)

_______________________________

2010 AMC 8 Winners:


Our Top Scorers:


1. Abhishek Lingineni (8th Grader) -   
    Perfect Score and Distinction
2. Tyler Shen (6th Grader) - Distinction
    and Achievement Roll
3. Thomas Draper (5th Grader) - Honor
    Roll and Achievement Roll
4. Byron Chin (6th Grader) -
Honor Roll
    and Achievement Roll

5. Lucia Wei (8th Grader) - Honor Roll
6. Ryan Kola (8th Grader) -
Honor Roll
7. Adam Li (8th Grader) - Honor Roll
8. Divya Unnam (6th Grader) - Honor 
    Roll
9. Matthew Pan (7th Grader)
10.Ananya Swaminathan (6th Grader) -
     Achievement Roll
11.Aslesha Parchure (7th Grader)
12.Tanmay Rao (8th Grader)
13.Warren Saengtawesin (8th Grader)
14.Isha Shah (7th Grader)
15.
Anish Visaria (7th Grader)

2011 AIME Qualifiers:

1. Abhishek Lingineni
2. Jason Shi

Typical Math Quiz Problems (for Olympiads)

 

 Problem 1
Let a1, a2, a3, ..., an be distinct positive integers and let M be a set of n - 1 positive integers not containing s = a1 + a2 + a3 + ....+ an. A grasshopper is to jump along the real axis, starting at the point 0 and making n jumps to the right with lengths a1, a2, a3, ...., an in some order.

Prove that the order can be chosen in such a way that the grasshopper never lands on any point in M. [IMO, 2009]


Problem 2
Let ABCD be a convex quadrilateral with BA different from BC. Denote the incircles of triangles ABC and ADC by k1 and k2 respectively. Suppose that there exists a circle k tangent to ray BA beyond A and to the ray BC beyond C, which is also tangent to the lines AD and CD.

Prove that the common external tangents to k1 and k2 intersects on k. [IMO, 2008]

Problem 3
Let P(x) be a polynomial of degree n > 1 with integer coefficients and let k be a positive integer. Consider the polynomial Q(x) = P(P(...P(P(x))...)), where P occurs k times.


Prove that there are at most n integers t such that Q(t) = t.  [IMO, 2006]


 

 

Contact us at info@princetonmathcircle.org